This series of podcasts was recorded at the 2017 annual Australian Walking and Cycling Conference.

Community Radio Broadcast of the 10 short episodes is easy to arrange. If you would like your local community station to broadcast them can contact the Community Radio Network on 02 93102999 or crn@cbaa.org.au to arrange secure download of broadcast ready files. More information is available at https://www.cbaa.org.au/article/step-away-car

Speakers in the series are Jason Chow, Elliot Fishman, Jan Garrard, Hulya Gilbert, Daniels Langeberg, Jess Miller, Jeremy Miller, Sam Powrie, Al Reid, Amanda Stirrat and Molly Wagner.

For more information about how your local community radio station can access the series and broadcast it, visit https://www.cbaa.org.au/article/step-away-car

 

Step away from the car podcasts
1 Port Adelaide BUG
Heavy industry, heavy vehicles, cyclists and pedestrians are a pretty uncomfortable combination in Port Adelaide. The grassroots Bicycle User Group there has been working for 35 years to “increase the margins of safety” for cyclists and pedestrians. BUG Secretary Sam Powrie describes the situation and some of their successes.

 

2 Knowing your place 3214
Most places hold endless stories and sights if you just take a closer look, Five self guided walks developed by local people in the northern suburbs of Geelong have captured many of them. Community Development Officer Amanda Stirrat  explains that support for cycling has been just one of the flow on effects of this project.

 

3 Step Away from the Car in Auckland
Hong Kong and New Zealand have very different traffic environments. Senior Traffic Engineer Jason Chow was born in Hong Kong but now works in Auckland, creating a variety of safe routes for cyclists and pedestrians. Find out why he describes one of those routes as “vibrant”

 

4 Women and Children Step Away from the Car
Why is it so hard for women and children to get out of the car and onto bikes, scooters and their own two feet? Jan Garrard and Hulya Gilbert are two researchers with a few answers. And some solutions.

 

     5 Let your driver do the pedaling
When walking and cycling don’t get you far enough fast enough then new technology opens up new possibilities of Active Transport. Pedicabs are not just for Asia, or a novelty for tourists in Australia, they could be a viable urban transport option … according to Adelaide entrepreur/ mechanic Daniels Langeberg.

 

6 The Institute of Sensible Transport
At peak hour an average Australian city traffic lane carries 2,000 people per hour. If they were on bikes that lane could move 14,000 people per hour. Those stats explain why Elliot Fishman, from the Institute of Sensible Transport is studying bicycle sharing.  Elliot was a keynote speaker at the Australian Walking and Cycling Conference.

 

7 The Trojan Horse of Fun
What happens when you take the dark arts of advertising and develop “collective impact” programs to encourage and support cycling in the City of Sydney?  Jess Miller has been finding out, in her work as Program Director with Republic of Everyone and especially as part of Clover Moore’s Independent team on the Sydney City Council…. Jess was a keynote speaker at the Australian Walking and Cycling Conference.

 

8 Keep an Eye on Bendigo
50 million share bikes in China is the prediction for 2025. But right now those share bikes often end up dumped on the street when they break down. Dockless bike share  has arrived in Australia and there are some nasty problems already experienced in China and in Melbourne and Sydney. But Bendigo is about to trial a locally designed smart system from the inventor/entrepreneur Al Reid which may have some answers

 

      9 No Trespassing: the Art and Politics of Walking in NSW
When the Wiradjuri warrior called Windradyne walked from Bathurst to Paramatta in 1824 it was to surrender to the white Governor to avoid further bloodshed. Pedestrian artist Molly L Wagner is retracing that 197km walk on foot … and that  experience has led to many new insights about art, history and politics.

 

10 Low Tech Movement in a High Tech World
The 2017 Australian Walking and Cycling Conference was attended by academic researchers, urban planners, policy makers, artists and community activists. How did all these perspectives come together, around the theme of Low Tech Movement in a High Tech World? Jeremy Miller was MC and Treasurer of the organizing committee and shared this overview when the conference was over.